Category Archives: Space participation

Night sky highlights for July 2021

** What’s Up: July 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA – NASA JPL

What are some skywatching highlights in July 2021? Venus blazes as the “Evening Star” following the sunset, with a much fainter planet Mars nearby. Catch their super close pairing on July 12. Plus, if you can find your way to dark skies, this is the best time of year to enjoy the magic of the Milky Way.

Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What’s Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/whats-up….

More:
https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/
https://blogs.nasa.gov/Watch_the_Skies/

** Tonight’s Sky: July Space Telescope Science Institute

In July, find the Scorpius constellation to identify the reddish supergiant Antares, which will lead you to discover a trio of globular star clusters. Keep watching for space-based views of these densely packed, spherical collections of ancient stars, as well as three nebulas: the Swan Nebula, the Lagoon Nebula, and the Trifid Nebula.

About this Series “Tonight’s Sky” is a monthly video of constellations you can observe in the night sky. The series is produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute, home of science operations for the Hubble Space Telescope, in partnership with NASA’s Universe of Learning. This is a recurring show, and you can find more episodes—and other astronomy videos—at https://hubblesite.org/resource-galle….

** What to see in the night sky: July 2021BBC Sky at Night Magazine

What can you see in the night sky tonight? Astronomers Pete Lawrence and Paul Abel talk us through July’s night-sky highlights.

** What’s in the Night Sky July 2021 #WITNSAlyn Wallace

In the night sky this month we have a noctilucent clouds, spot the Chinese Space Station Tiangong (Tianhe-1), an awesome conjunction between Mars and Venus and of course the Milky Way.

** Night Sky Notebook July 2021Peter Detterline

** July: Inner Planets Rule! – Sky & Telescope

This month’s Sky Tour astronomy podcast tells you “what’s up” in the evening sky. No experience or equipment is necessary — just download or stream the audio file and take it with you outside. With the last-quarter Moon on July 1st and new Moon on the 9th, your darkest evenings for stargazing are during the first half of the month.

Two of the Sun’s inner planets are doing a little dance over in the west after sunset this month. Look just to the upper left of the sunset point for Venus. This planet is quite bright, but its dazzle is diminished somewhat due to the twilight around it. In early July, a second and much dimmer planet is lurking just to the upper left of Venus. That’s Mars, just 1% as bright as Venus.

** See also:

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Stellaris: People of the Stars

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Envisioning Exoplanets:
Searching for Life in the Galaxy

National Space Society’s ISDC 2021 – virtual 4-day conference – opens June 24

The National Space Society‘s annual meeting – International Space Development Conference (ISDC 2021)–  starts today, June 24th as a virtual on-line event. The presentations on the first 3 days are available at no charge. An Interactive ISDC Sunday ($45) will bring “participants into contact with leading space experts in an interactive format. These discussions [will be] challenging and stimulating.

ISDC2021.NSS.org : June 24-26 – free, June 27 – $45

The above graphic shows some of the Speakers.  Check out the elaborate Schedule of talks, panels, and debates.

From the NSS:

Please join us on Thursday-Sunday, June 24-27, for our multi-day virtual event, ISDC 2021. This exciting, four-day virtual event looks at the future of space exploration, development and settlement. And best of all, it’s entirely FREE for the first three days! Beginning at 12:00 PM EDT (9:00 AM PDT).

For complete information including a full schedule, go to isdc2021.nss.org.

The International Space Development Conference® (ISDC®), will focus on key areas of space development: space settlement, space policy, space solar power, Moon, and international space programs and will include presentations by students from the Space Settlement Design Competition and the NSS Space Settlement Contest. ISDC 2021 will be a virtual event showcasing the technologies, people and organizations that will lead us to develop the final frontier!

ISDC 2021 presents the finest minds in this movement to develop space, with experts presenting the latest visions of humanity’s migration into space: where we will go, why we will go there, and how we will do so. Speakers include engineers and scientists working in new space; top minds from the aerospace and defense sectors; and educators, physicians, and investors focusing on the business and future of space travel, settlement, and exploration.

Night sky highlights for June 2021

[ Update: What’s Up: June 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA – NASA JPL

What are some skywatching highlights in June 2021? Catch Saturn and Jupiter in the morning, and the constellation Scorpius after dark! Plus skywatchers in the Northeast U.S., Eastern Canada, and Northern Europe can see a partial solar eclipse on June 10th. Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What’s Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/whats-up….

]

** Tonight’s Sky: JuneSpace Telescope Science Institute

Though the nights are shorter in June, they are filled with fine sights. Look for the Hercules constellation, which will lead you to a globular star cluster with hundreds of thousands of densely packed stars. You can also spot Draco the dragon, which will point you to the Cat’s Eye Nebula. Keep watching for space-based views of globular star clusters and the nebula.

** What to see in the night sky: June 2021BBC Sky at Night Magazine

What can you see in the night sky tonight? Astronomers Pete Lawrence and Paul Abel guide us through June’s astronomy highlights, including the partial solar eclipse visible on 10 June

** What’s in the Night Sky June 2021 #WITNSAlyn Wallace

This month we have an annular solar eclipse, noctilucent clouds and Mars passes through the Beehive Cluster.

** Night Sky Notebook June 2021Peter Detterline

** See also:

=== Amazon Ads ===

Stellaris: People of the Stars

===

Envisioning Exoplanets:
Searching for Life in the Galaxy

Videos: May 2021 night sky highlights

** What’s Up: May 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA – NASA JPL

What are some skywatching highlights in May 2021? Beginning mid-May, find all four inner planets (including Earth!) near the western horizon after sunset. And on May 26, a supermoon total eclipse.

Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What’s Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/whats-up….

** Tonight’s Sky: May – Space Telescope Science Institute

In May, we are looking away from the crowded, dusty plane of our own galaxy toward a region where the sky is brimming with distant galaxies. Locate Virgo to find a concentration of roughly 2,000 galaxies and search for Coma Berenices to identify many more. Keep watching for space-based views of galaxies like the Sombrero Galaxy, M87, and M64.

** What to see in the night sky: May 2021BBC Sky at Night Magazine

What can you see in the night sky tonight? Astronomers Pete Lawrence and Paul Abel guide us through April’s night sky highlights and reveal the stars, constellations and planets worth looking out for over the coming weeks.

** What’s in the Night Sky May 2021 #WITNSAlyn Wallace

** Night Sky Notebook May 2021Peter Detterline

** See also:

=== Amazon Ad ===

Stellaris: People of the Stars

===

Envisioning Exoplanets:
Searching for Life in the Galaxy

Videos: Night sky highlights for April 2020

[ Update:  What’s Up: March 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA – NASA JPL

What are some skywatching highlights in April 2021? Look for the rosy arch known as the Belt of Venus at sunset, then find the constellation Leo overhead on April evenings. Also, check out Jupiter and Saturn with the Moon on April 6. Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What’s Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/whats-up….

]

** Tonight’s Sky: April – Space Telescope Science Institute

Clear April nights are filled with starry creatures. Near the Big Dipper, you will find several interesting binary stars. You can also spot galaxies like the Pinwheel Galaxy, M82, and M96—the last of which is an asymmetric galaxy that may have been gravitationally disrupted by encounters with its neighbors. Keep watching for space-based views of these celestial objects.

** What to see in the night sky: April 2021BBC Sky at Night Magazine

What can you see in the night sky tonight? Astronomers Pete Lawrence and Paul Abel guide us through April’s night sky highlights and reveal the stars, constellations and planets worth looking out for over the coming weeks.

** What’s in the Night Sky April 2021 #WITNSAlyn Wallace

** Night Sky Notebook March 2021Peter Detterline

** See also:

=== Amazon Ad ===

Stellaris: People of the Stars

===

Envisioning Exoplanets:
Searching for Life in the Galaxy