Videos: SSI 50 Space Settlement conference presentations

The Space Studies Institute is posting videos of the presentations and panel discussions at the recent SSI 50: The Space Settlement Enterprise conference held in Seattle.

Here are two videos of the initial panel session, which was titled Space Habitat Design:

  • Panel host Dallas Bienhoff of Cislunar Development Corp (at 00:05:20)
  • Bruce Pittman of Offworld Inc (at 00:13:00)
  • Robert Richards of Northrop Grumman (at 00:26:45)
  • Fred Scharmen of Morgan State University (at 00:38:40)
  • Suzanna Bianco of Space Cooperative and Space Decentral (at 00:47:50)
  • John Blincow of Gateway Foundation (at 01:01:45)
  • Al Globus of National Space Society and coauthor of The High Frontier An Easier Way (at 01:11:30)
  • Anthony Longman of Skyframe Research (at 01:32:20)

SSI has sponsored projects in exotic propulsion and Prof. Heidi Fearn talked about the Mach Effect Drive project, which has gotten NASA NIAC funding: SSI 50: Professor Heidi Fearn Mach Effect Drives Update | Space Studies Institute

SSI Senior Associate Professor Heidi Fearn of California State University Fullerton speaks at the lunch session of the SSI 50 gathering September 9th, 2019 st the Museum of Flight In Seattle.

Dr. Fearn who, along with SSI SA Dr. James Woodard, had just been featured in the August 2019 Issue of Scientific American, updates us on the status of the Exotic Propulsion Initiative.

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The High Frontier: An Easier Way

Space policy roundup – Oct.1.2019

A sampling of links to recent space policy, politics, and government (US and international) related space news and resource items that I found of interest (find previous space policy roundups here):

Webcasts:

** New Launch and Propulsion Technologies, Intersatellite Links and Market Consolidation to Redefine SmallSats  – | Kratos Communications

Joining the Constellations Podcast at the recent Small Sat Conference, Leena Pivovarova, NSR Analyst, covered a range of topics that will have significant impact on the persona of the small sat industry. With respect to the role of governments, Leena states that in addition to their regulatory oversight, they are also participants, customers, enablers, facilitators. Because of this, there really must be alignment and government support, which includes having supporting regulations that enable, instead of kind of stifle innovation.

** Episode T+134: Headlines (with news on Orion, NEOCam, and more) – Main Engine Cut Off

I’ve got a special preview of MECO Headlines for the main feed this week, with news on Orion, NASA’s FY2020 budget, NEOCam’s legacy, Starship, and more.

** The Space Show – Sun, 09/29/2019 – Dr. David Livingston led a discussion with listeners about “the Musk Saturday evening press conference plus the article I called out on spreading Early molecules throughout space including Mars”.

** The Space Show – Fri, 09/27/2019Dallas Bienhoff of Cislunar Space Development Company talked about “Cislunar and lunar development, space settlement, O’Neill vision, free space habitats, needed technologies, challenges and timelines”.

 

The Space Show this week – Sept.30.2019

The guests and topics of discussion on The Space Show this week:

1. Monday, Sept. 30, 2019; 2:00 pm PDT (4:00 pm CDT, 5:00 pm EDT): No show today as Monday is reserved for special programming.

2. Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019; 7-8:30 pm PDT (9-10:30 pm CDT, 10-11:30 pm EDT): We welcome back Michelle Hanlon from For All Moonkind, which seeks to protect Apollo landing sites on the Moon, for news and updates.

3. Wednesday, Oct. 2 2019: Pre-recorded Hotel Mars Program with John Batchelor. See Upcoming Show on The Space Show website for details.

4. Friday, Oct. 4, 2019; 9:30-11:00 am PDT (11:30 am-1:00 pm CDT, 12:30-2:00 pm EDT): We welcome back space law expert Laura Montgomery for news and views for legal commercial space issues.

5. Sunday, Oct. 6, 2019; 12-1:30 pm PDT (3-4:30 pm EDT, 2-3:30 pm CDT): OPEN LINES. We welcome back Christopher Stone for news and views and important goings on with national security space.

Some recent shows:

** Sun, 09/29/2019 – Dr. David Livingston led a discussion with listeners about “the Musk Saturday evening press conference plus the article I called out on spreading Early molecules throughout space including Mars”.

** Fri, 09/27/2019 –  Dallas Bienhoff talked about “Cislunar and lunar development, space settlement, O’Neill vision, free space habitats, needed technologies, challenges and timelines”.

** Tue, 09/24/2019Dr. Anahita Modiriasari talked about “Lunar and to a lesser degree Martian lava tubes” and “lava tube characteristics, qualities, sizes, uses, and more”.

** Sun, 09/22/2019 – Space attorney Wayne White  discussed property rights and other commercial space legal issues.

See also:
* The Space Show Archives
* The Space Show Newsletter
* The Space Show Shop

The Space Show is a project of the One Giant Leap Foundation.

The Space Show - David Livingston
The Space Show – David Livingston

 

Space transport roundup – Sept.30.2019

A sampling of recent articles, videos, and images dealing with space transport (find previous roundups here):

** SpaceX:

*** Elon Musk presents plans for rapid development of Starship/Super Heavy Booster space transport system while standing in front of first assembled Starship demonstrator on Saturday evening.

Some of the highlights from his remarks:

  • Starships Mk.1 and Mk.2 (Cocoa Beach, Florida) are just the first vehicles off the assembly lines.
    • Expect to complete a new vehicle every few months
    • Each will incorporate lessons learned from the previous vehicles.
  • Switching from composite to stainless steel brought multiple advantages:
    • Enables fast prototyping
    • Excellent strength and thermal properties
    • Much cheaper than composites
  • Mk.1 to fly to 20 kilometers in 1 to 2 months from now.
  • Doesn’t expect big regulatory problems with test flights and landings.
  • Before assembling first Super Heavy Booster (SH), need to ramp-up Raptor engine production.
  • Need about 30 engines for first SH.
  • SS Mk 4 or Mk.5 with first SH could launch to orbit by next year
  • Full reusability with rapid turnaround will enable multiple test flights in a short period.
  • Will fly crews within a year or so.
  • Will fly SS/SH from both Boca Chica and Kennedy Space Center launch sites.

*** Sampling of articles and responses to the presentation:

*** Time lapse of stacking of the Starship Mk.1 – LabPadre:

*** Scott Manley’s view of the presentation:

Reports leading up to the presentation:

*** A drone view of the Cocoa Beach facility where the Starship Mk.2 demonstrator is under construction:

*** Elon believes the Starships will enable large space settlements on the Moon and Mars. Some of the artwork shown:

 

*** SpaceX Crew Dragon developments:

Musk estimated that Crew Dragon capsule 03 (C203) and its expendable trunk would be sent from SpaceX’s Hawthorne, CA factory to Cape Canaveral, FL as early as October. Crew Dragon capsule C204 is then expected to follow around one month later, arriving in Florida for preflight preparation as early as November

SpaceX has applied for an FCC Special Temporary Authority license to authorize rocket communications during what is likely Crew Dragon’s In-Flight Abort (IFA) test, now scheduled to occur no earlier than November 23rd.

In line with recent comments from SpaceX executives, a November or December In-Flight Abort test would almost certainly preclude Crew Dragon from launching with astronauts in 2019, pushing the Demo-2 mission into the Q1 2020. Nevertheless, it would serve as a good sign that Crew Dragon remains on track if SpaceX can complete the critical abort test – meant to prove that Dragon can whisk astronauts away from a failing rocket at any point during launch – before the year is out.

NASA and SpaceX conducted a formal verification of the company’s emergency escape, or egress, system at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Florida on Sept. 18, 2019. NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Shannon Walker participated in the exercise to verify the crew can safely and swiftly evacuate from the launch pad in the unlikely event of an emergency before liftoff of SpaceX’s first crewed flight test, called Demo-2.

NASA astronauts Shannon Walker, in front, and Bob Behnken participated in the exercise to verify the crew can safely and quickly evacuate from the launch pad in the unlikely event of an emergency before liftoff of SpaceX’s first crewed flight test, called Demo-2. During the escape verification, Walker and Behnken pass through the water deluge system on the 265-foot level of the crew access tower. Photo credit: SpaceX
NASA: “NASA astronauts Shannon Walker, in front, and Bob Behnken participated in the exercise to verify the crew can safely and quickly evacuate from the launch pad in the unlikely event of an emergency before liftoff of SpaceX’s first crewed flight test, called Demo-2. During the escape verification, Walker and Behnken pass through the water deluge system on the 265-foot level of the crew access tower.”Photo credit: SpaceX

**  Japanese HTV-8 launched last week docked with the ISS on Saturday:

** Latest Ariane 6 news: Ariane 6’s core engine completes qualification tests – ESA

Ariane 6, Europe’s next-generation launch vehicle, has passed another key development milestone. Its Vulcain 2.1 liquid-fuelled engine has now completed its qualification testing, which means combined tests can now begin.

The main stage Vulcain 2.1 engine will deliver 135 t of thrust to propel Ariane 6 in the first eight minutes of flight up to an altitude of 200 km.

** Russia launches 2nd Soyuz in two days. Puts missile warning satellite into low earth orbit: Soyuz 2-1B launches latest Tundra satellite – NASASpaceFlight.com

Russia’s Soyuz rocket has made its second launch in less than twenty-four hours, delivering a missile detection satellite to orbit Thursday in a military launch from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome. Soyuz lifted off at 10:46 Moscow Time (07:46 UTC), placing the Tundra satellite into its planned orbit with the aid of a Fregat upper stage.

Tundra plays a significant part in Russia’s national security arrangements, monitoring the Earth for potentially hostile missile launches so the Russian Government can react as necessary. It forms part of the Edinaya Kosmicheskaya Sistema (EKS) or Unified Space System which is being introduced to replace the earlier Oko system that Russia inherited from the Soviet Union. Thursday’s launch deployed the third such satellite.

** Reports of the death of Stratolaunch appear to have been exaggerated: Stratolaunch rebuilds team for world’s biggest plane – GeekWire

Representatives of the Allen family’s Vulcan holding company have insisted that Stratolaunch remains operational. LinkedIn listings indicate that Jean Floyd is still president and CEO, although three company vice presidents left in July.

Now Stratolaunch is posting 11 job openings, including listings for two test pilots. “As a test pilot on the history-making Stratolaunch Carrier Aircraft, the world’s largest-wingspan aircraft, you will have the opportunity to accomplish new milestones in aviation,” the company says.

** Rocket Lab prepares launch facility at Wallops Island, Virginia: Rocket Lab Readies Launch Complex 2 for Electron Launches From U.S. Soil | Rocket Lab

Rocket Lab, the global leader in dedicated small satellite launch, and Virginia Space at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS), have completed a major construction milestone ahead of the first Electron launch from U.S. soil. The recent installation of the launch platform at Rocket Lab’s second launch site, Launch Complex 2, marks one of the final steps in the construction of the new pad being built by the Rocket Lab and Virginia Space teams.

Construction on Launch Complex 2, located at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) on Wallops Island, Virginia, began in February 2019. In the few months since then, more than 1,400 cubic yards of concrete have been poured to create the pad on which Electron’s launch platform is mounted. The 66 ton launch platform was installed into its final position this month, ready for the 44 foot, 7.6 ton strongback to be mounted to the platform in coming weeks. Both the launch platform and strongback were built by Steel America in Norfolk, Virginia. The launch site largely mirrors Rocket Lab’s first launch location, Launch Complex 1 in New Zealand, where the Electron launch vehicle transports horizontally down the launch ramp, and then is lifted vertically by the strongback to be ready for launch.

In the coming weeks, work will focus on final build and integration of various launch pad systems that will process, load propellant into, and launch Electron. The final step in the completion of the site is integration and test activities, which is expected to be complete by December 2019. Once the site is complete, work begins on testing, commissioning, and integration at the launch site in preparation for the first Electron launch from U.S. soil in early 2020.

** Blue Origin plans to start  flying New Shepard with people on board after two more uncrewed test flights. However, the test flights won’t happen before November.

From CNBC:

The company is developing the New Shepard rocket system for its space tourism business. Blue Origin is still hoping to fly people on New Shepard this year, although the company noted in a meeting with reporters on Tuesday that 2019 is quickly coming to an end, so those plans may move to 2020.

Blue Origin also filed an application for its next test flight with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Tuesday. The filing is “for Flight #12 of the New Shepard space launch booster and capsule” and has an operational window beginning in November. To be clear, that’s not necessarily when Blue Origin will next launch New Shepard, but rather the earliest time they could with federal approvals.

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Delta-v

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