Category Archives: Space Collecting

Dave Scott’s watch worn on the Moon sells for $1,625,000

I posted here earlier that the watch worn by astronaut Dave Scott on the lunar surface was up for auction. The auction resulted in a record setting price for an astronaut memorabilia item: RR Auction: Past Auction Item – Item 9001 – Apollo 15 Lunar Surface Chronograph –

Minimum Bid: $50,000.00
Sold Price: $1,625,000.00

Apollo15_watch4

Robert Pearlman says the buyer’s identity was not revealed: Astronaut’s watch worn on the moon sells for record $1.6 million – collectSPACE

The Bulova timepiece, which Apollo 15 commander David Scott wore during NASA’s fourth successful lunar landing mission in 1971, was sold by RR Auction of Boston for an astronomical $1,625,000 to businessman from Florida who wished to remain anonymous. The sale, which opened at $50,000 online on Oct. 15, ended Thursday evening during a live auction where the winner and his competing bidders participated by phone.

Scott, who also called in, listened as his very-well-traveled watch soared in a span of just five minutes from $475,000 to the hammer of $1.3 million (the $1.625 million includes the buyer’s premium charged by the auction house).

This substantially beats the previous record for an astronaut item sale:

The previous record was for a cuff checklist used by Charles Conrad, the third man to walk on the moon, which reportedly sold for $1.3 million to a private buyer in 2001.

Only Russian spacecraft have gotten higher prices in auctions of Moon Race era items.

Pearlman points to another Apollo timepiece that will be going up for auction later this year: Omega Speedmaster 50 – Christie’s.

However, this watch, owned by Ron Evans of the Apollo 17 mission, stayed in orbit in the command module and did not go down to the lunar surface.

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Here is a statement from RR Auctions about this auction:

Dave Scott’s Apollo 15 watch sold for $1.6M at auction
Only privately owned watch worn on the Moon

BOSTON, MA – (October, 23 15) Dave Scott’s Apollo 15 lunar surface-worn chronograph watch sold for $1,625,000 according to Boston-based RR Auction.

Of the dozen men that have stepped foot on the moon, all wore the standard Omega Speedmasters. Officially issued by NASA, those Omegas are acknowledged as government property; many, including Dave Scott’s used during his first two moonwalks, are housed in institutions.

This leaves Commander Scott’s Bulova Chronograph as the singular lunar surface-worn watch in private hands.

After the second moonwalk, Scott noticed that the crystal of his Omega had popped off when he returned to the cabin, therefore he needed to call upon his own personal backup watch, the Bulova watch.

The Bulova Wrist Chronograph was worn during his third and final moonwalk of the mission.  As Commander Scott stepped onto the moon for his final lunar excursion, he wore this watch. When he saluted the American flag against the background of the majestic expanse of Hadley Delta, this watch adorned his left wrist.

“Among the decisions I made, the monitoring of time was perhaps most important,” Commander Dave Scott stated in a detailed five-page letter that accompanied the sale.

Apollo 15’s third lunar excursion—lasting 4 hours, 49 minutes, 50 seconds—was perhaps the most reliant on time expenditures, as Dave Scott and Jim Irwin conscientiously balanced their resources before departure, and eventual journey home. The watch, exhibits significant wear from exposure while on the Moon, and from splashdown and recovery.

“We are extremely pleased with the results and honored to have been able to offer such an historically important timepiece—the only American-made watch that was worn on the surface of the Moon,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Highlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

  • Gordon Cooper’s Mercury 9 Flight Plan Roller, sold for $89,775.
  • Apollo 16 Flown Cover, sold for $76,772.
  • Dave Scott’s Apollo 15 Lunar Surface-Used Rover map, sold for $37,485.
  • Buzz Aldrin’s Apollo 11 ‘Type 2’ Flown Cover, sold for $36,111.

Online bidding for The Space and Aviation Autograph from RR Auction began on October 15 and concluded on October 22. At 7:00 pm ET, a single lot live auction of Dave Scott’s watch took place at RR Auction’s Boston Gallery. More details, including results can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

Watch worn by astronaut Dave Scott on the lunar surface up for auction

The watch worn by astronaut Dave Scott while on the surface of the Moon during the Apollo 15 mission is up for auction: Apollo 15 Lunar Surface Chronograph.

Apollo15_watch4

Here’s a statement from RR Auction about the watch:

Dave Scott’s Apollo 15 Chronograph Watch to be auctioned
Only privately owned watch worn on the Moon— set for auction on October 22

BOSTON, MA – (October, 1 15) Dave Scott’s Apollo 15 lunar surface-worn chronograph watch will be auctioned Boston-based RR Auction.

Of the select dozen men that have stepped foot on the Moon, all have worn the standard Omega chronographs. Officially issued by NASA, they are acknowledged as government property, and many, including Dave Scott’s watch used during his first two moonwalks are housed in institutions, a distinction that leaves Commander Scott’s Bulova Chronograph, worn during his third and final moonwalk of the mission— as the only lunar surface watch in private hands.

Apollo15_watch1The watch is visible here on Scott’s left hand.

The Bulova Wrist Chronograph, exhibits significant wear from exposure while on the Moon, and from splashdown and recovery.

“Among the decisions I made, the monitoring of time was perhaps most important,” Commander Dave Scott stated in a detailed five-page letter of authenticity confirming its background story and mission use.Colonel David R. Scott—Gemini 8 Pilot, Apollo 9 CMP, Apollo 15 CDR—amassed a combined 546 hours in space, was the seventh man to walk on the Moon and the first astronaut to operate the Lunar Rover on the Moon’s surface.

“This may be a once in a lifetime chance to own a watch that was worn on the surface of the Moon,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. “In 2014, we auctioned Dave Scott’s hand controller – used to land on the moon for $610,000, and I expect that the watch will sell for much more, somewhere between $750,000 – $1,000,000.”

The Space and Aviation Autograph and Artifact Auction by RR Auction will run from October 15 through October 22.

Apollo15_watch0

Online bidding for the Dave Scott’s Apollo 15 Lunar Surface Chronograph will be available until 6:00 pm ET on October 22. At 7:00 pm ET, the live auction of this lot will begin in our Boston Gallery. Only phone bids or in-person bids will be accepted during the live auction.

For information, visit the RR Auction web site at www.rrauction.com.

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More images in the Bulova chronograph Apoll0 15 image gallery.

Space memorabilia auction online to support Astronaut Scholarship Foundation

The 2015 Fall Auction of Astronaut Memorabilia to support the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation is currently underway:

Astronaut Scholarship Foundation to Host
Bi-Annual Online Auction of Space Memorabilia

Money raised from sale of 46 collectibles and astronaut experiences
to help fund STEM scholarships for outstanding college students

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. – From unique collectibles and signed memorabilia to one-of-a-kind flown artifacts, the public will have its chance to bid on some of the hottest space keepsakes when the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation (ASF) hosts its fall 2015 online auction beginning Sept. 19. Money raised from the auction will play a key role in funding college scholarships for outstanding science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) students across the United States.

“The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation is very fortunate to have such strong relationships with so many astronauts who are willing to donate their personal space memorabilia in support of our mission,” said Tammy Knowles, ASF’s executive director. “Our bi-annual online auction is filled with collectible items from more than five decades of space travel, all personally donated by astronauts and patrons. These generous gifts help us raise significant dollars to help shape the next generation of science and technology leaders.”

The auction will take place beginning at 9 a.m. Eastern on Saturday, Sept. 19 and run through Friday, Sept. 25 at 10 p.m. Eastern. A special preview of this year’s auction will open on Friday, Sept. 18 at 9 a.m. Eastern. The preview allows the public to register, obtain their bidding numbers and get a sneak peek at the items. This season, there are a total of 46 lots up for bid, including:

  • Official NASA Apollo Earth Orbit Chart signed by 13 Apollo astronauts, including four who walked on the Moon (Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr., Alan Bean, Eugene “Gene” Cernan and Charles “Charlie” Duke, Jr.). Entitled “Apollo Mission 12, For November 1969 Launch Dates,” this first edition chart measures approximately 13.5 inches by 42 inches.
  • Skylab Astronaut Maneuvering Unit (AMU) checklist cover, which was flown during Skylab 4 and worn on the cuffs of astronauts Gerald “Jerry” Carr, Edward Gibson and William Pogue as they worked in space.
  • Flown Apollo 14 beta cloth patch, silkscreened with the mission insignia and signed by astronaut Edgar Mitchell. The patch is made from the same material used to create fire-resistant space suits.
  • Skylab-Flown, serial-numbered pen and pencil, which were launched with the Skylab workshop in May 1973 and returned to Earth with the final Skylab crew in February 1974.

In addition, the ASF will auction four of its signature “Astronaut Experiences,” which offer bidders the chance to win a one-on-one encounter with a space explorer. This year’s experiences include:

  • A behind-the-scenes, VIP tour for two at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, donated by Jacobs Technology, Inc., the corporate sponsor of ASF’s Workforce Initiative.
  • Two tickets, plus an astronaut special table guest, to the Astronaut Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony in May 2016.
  • Two breathtaking hiking adventures (one of which to take place in Shenandoah National Park).

For a complete listing of items, visit www.astronautscholarship.org/auction on Sept. 18.

While ASF has hosted live and silent auctions during its fundraising events over the past 30 years, the organization branched into online auctions in the early 2000s to appeal to a broader audience.

“Our online auction allows us to reach collectors around the world, who might not be able to attend one of our fundraising events,” Knowles said. “Over the past 10 years, auctions such as this one have helped us raise in excess of $1.5 million for our scholarship program.”

People interested in participating in the fall 2015 online auction must register in advance, beginning Sept. 18. Once the auction opens, participants may submit bids as many times as desired during the bidding period using the forms located on each lot page.

Winning bidders will be notified via email. Items will be shipped at the bidder’s expense. Cash, checks and credit cards will be accepted for payment of items. The full list of rules and regulations will be posted online on Sept. 18.

About the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation: Founded in 1984 by the surviving Mercury 7 astronauts, the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation (ASF) helps the United States retain its world leadership in science and technology. Through the garnered support of astronauts, industry leaders, educational institutions and patrons, ASF awards merit-based scholarships to the best and brightest university students who excel in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The prestigious Astronaut Scholarship is known nationwide for being among the highest scholarships awarded to undergraduate STEM students. Since its inception, ASF has awarded in excess of $4 million in scholarships to more than 470 of the nation’s top scholars.

Space memorabilia market is growing

When I started HobbySpace in 1999, I was sure that reusable space vehicles would be flying regularly by now and taking lots of space tourists to orbit. I was also sure that collecting space memorabilia would become a popular activity and a lucrative business as Baby Boomers began to grow nostalgic for the Space Age era of their youth. Still waiting on those first two predictions but the third has worked out pretty much as expected : NASA memorabilia fetching high prices among collectors: Do not call it space junk – The Boston Globe.

[Larry] McGlynn, who owns an insurance company in Sudbury, is one of the foremost collectors and appraisers of NASA artifacts, and part of a burgeoning market for items that traveled to the final frontier. Over the past 20 years, the value of these items has exploded, McGlynn said; a star chart from Apollo 11 — the first lunar landing — that went for $500 in 1995 can command upward of $30,000 today.

The RR Auction house mentioned in the article currently has a handful of items in their Space section.

Astronaut Scholarship Foundation hosting online auction of space memorabilia

A message from the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation (ASF):

Astronaut Scholarship Foundation to Host
Bi-Annual Online Auction of Space Memorabilia
Money raised from sale of 46 collectibles and astronaut experiences
to help fund STEM scholarships for outstanding college students

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. – From unique collectibles and signed memorabilia to one-of-a-kind flown artifacts, the public will have its chance to bid on some of the hottest space keepsakes when the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation (ASF) hosts its fall 2015 online auction beginning Sept. 19. Money raised from the auction will play a key role in funding college scholarships for outstanding science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) students across the United States.

“The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation is very fortunate to have such strong relationships with so many astronauts who are willing to donate their personal space memorabilia in support of our mission,” said Tammy Knowles, ASF’s executive director. “Our bi-annual online auction is filled with collectible items from more than five decades of space travel, all personally donated by astronauts and patrons. These generous gifts help us raise significant dollars to help shape the next generation of science and technology leaders.”

The auction will take place beginning at 9 a.m. Eastern on Saturday, Sept. 19 and run through Friday, Sept. 25 at 10 p.m. Eastern. A special preview of this year’s auction will open on Friday, Sept. 18 at 9 a.m. Eastern. The preview allows the public to register, obtain their bidding numbers and get a sneak peek at the items. This season, there are a total of 46 lots up for bid, including:

  • Official NASA Apollo Earth Orbit Chart signed by 13 Apollo astronauts, including four who walked on the Moon (Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr., Alan Bean, Eugene “Gene” Cernan and Charles “Charlie” Duke, Jr.). Entitled “Apollo Mission 12, For November 1969 Launch Dates,” this first edition chart measures approximately 13.5 inches by 42 inches.
  • Skylab Astronaut Maneuvering Unit (AMU) checklist cover, which was flown during Skylab 4 and worn on the cuffs of astronauts Gerald “Jerry” Carr, Edward Gibson and William Pogue as they worked in space.
  • Flown Apollo 14 beta cloth patch, silkscreened with the mission insignia and signed by astronaut Edgar Mitchell. The patch is made from the same material used to create fire-resistant space suits.
  • Skylab-Flown, serial-numbered pen and pencil, which were launched with the Skylab workshop in May 1973 and returned to Earth with the final Skylab crew in February 1974.

In addition, the ASF will auction four of its signature “Astronaut Experiences,” which offer bidders the chance to win a one-on-one encounter with a space explorer. This year’s experiences include:

  • A behind-the-scenes, VIP tour for two at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, donated by Jacobs Technology, Inc., the corporate sponsor of ASF’s Workforce Initiative.
  • Two tickets, plus an astronaut special table guest, to the Astronaut Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony in May 2016.
  • Two breathtaking hiking adventures (one of which to take place in Shenandoah National Park).

For a complete listing of items, visit www.astronautscholarship.org/auction on Sept. 18.

While ASF has hosted live and silent auctions during its fundraising events over the past 30 years, the organization branched into online auctions in the early 2000s to appeal to a broader audience.

“Our online auction allows us to reach collectors around the world, who might not be able to attend one of our fundraising events,” Knowles said. “Over the past 10 years, auctions such as this one have helped us raise in excess of $1.5 million for our scholarship program.”

People interested in participating in the fall 2015 online auction must register in advance, beginning Sept. 18. Once the auction opens, participants may submit bids as many times as desired during the bidding period using the forms located on each lot page.

Winning bidders will be notified via email. Items will be shipped at the bidder’s expense. Cash, checks and credit cards will be accepted for payment of items. The full list of rules and regulations will be posted online on Sept. 18.

About the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation: Founded in 1984 by the surviving Mercury 7 astronauts, the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation (ASF) helps the United States retain its world leadership in science and technology. Through the garnered support of astronauts, industry leaders, educational institutions and patrons, ASF awards merit-based scholarships to the best and brightest university students who excel in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The prestigious Astronaut Scholarship is known nationwide for being among the highest scholarships awarded to undergraduate STEM students. Since its inception, ASF has awarded in excess of $4 million in scholarships to more than 470 of the nation’s top scholars.