All posts by TopSpacer

Night sky highlights for November 2022

** What’s Up: November 2022 Skywatching Tips from NASA – NASA JPL

What are some skywatching highlights in November 2022?

A total lunar eclipse brings some magic to the morning sky on November 8th, and the Leonid meteors peak after midnight on November 18th, with some glare from a 35% full moon. In addition, enjoy pretty views on other days in November when the Moon visits planets Mars and Saturn, and bright star Spica.

0:00 Intro
0:10 Total lunar eclipse
1:25 Moon & planet highlights
2:16 Leonid meteor shower
3:15 Nov ember Moon phases

Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What’s Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/skywatch….

** Tonight’s Sky: November – Space Telescope Science InstituteTonight’s Sky

In November, hunt for the fainter constellations of fall, including Pisces, Aries, and Triangulum. They will guide you to find several galaxies and a pair of white stars. Stay tuned for space-based views of spiral galaxy M74 and the Triangulum Galaxy, which are shown in visible, infrared, and ultraviolet light

** What to see in the night sky: November 2022BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Pete Lawrence and Paul Abel reveal the best things to see in the night sky this month, including observing Mars as it approaches opposition, catching Jupiter’s Galilean moons, the Leonid meteor shower, the Orion constellation, the Winter Triangle asterism and the Crab Nebula.

** Sky & Telescope’s Sky Tour Podcast – November 2022 – Sky & Telescope Youtube

Our monthly Sky Tour #astronomy #podcast provides an informative and entertaining 10-minute guided tour of the nighttime sky. Listen to the November episode and learn about the total #lunareclipse, check out three bright #planets in the evening sky, get the lowdown on a celestial queen, and get ready for three #meteor showers.

See also

** What’s in the Night Sky November 2022 #WITNS | Lunar Eclipse | Leonid Meteor Shower – Alyn Wallace

00:00 Intro
00:59 Northern Hemisphere Night Sky
02:12 Southern Hemisphere Night Sky
03:36 Full Moon
03:46 Lunar Eclipse
04:40 Northern Taurids
05:40 Leonids
06:46 #WITNS Winners

** Night Sky Notebook November 2022Peter Detterline

What’s happening in the sky for November 2022.

** See also:

=== Amazon Ads ===

Celestron
70mm Travel Scope
Portable Refractor Telescope
Fully-Coated Glass Optics
Ideal Telescope for Beginners
BONUS Astronomy Software Package

==

Stellaris: People of the Stars

The Space Show this week – Oct.31.2022

The guests and topics of discussion on The Space Show this week:

1. Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2022; 7 pm PST (9 pm CST, 10 pm EST): No Space Show program today.

2. Hotel Mars – Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022; 1:00 pm PST (3:00 pm CST, 4:00 pm EST): No Hotel Mars this week.

3. Friday, Nov.4, 2022; 9:30-11 am PST (11:30 am-1 pm CST, 12:30-2 pm EST): We welcome back Andrew Chanin regarding commercial space investing, the UFO EFT and lots more.

4. Sunday, Nov.6, 2022; 12-1:30 pm PST (2-3:30 pm CST, 3-4:30 pm EST): OPEN LINES today. We want to hear your Space Show story plus what’s on your mind regarding space. Call us at 1-866-7223.

Some recent shows:

** Sunday, Oct.30.2022Jason Achilles talked “about sound on other planets, the microphone on Mars, technical details of such microphones and sound systems plus the Exocam.io for seeing landings on other planets“.

** Friday, Oct.28.2022Thomas Marotta gave an update

on his Spaceport Company, launch and related issues. We also talked space settlement, commercial launch markets, the gravity RX, cislunar reliable transportation and much more.

** Tuesday, Oct.25.2022Thomas Lagarde discussed “Space architecture designs, current projects, primary space design concerns such as space toilet, orbital construction, tourism, settlement, government vs. private projects, life support, plants in space and more“.

** Sunday, Oct.23.2022Dr. David Livingston led an open lines program with callers.

Thank you to those that offered me best wishes for the NSS Space Pioneer Award for 2023 which I will receive at ISDC 2023. We talked multiple topics with several callers and listeners sending in emails. The topics included fusion energy, interplanetary travel with fusion (or not), Starship, cislunar, and company news plus more.

** Friday, Oct.21.2022John Strickland  returned to the show and

announced that I was being honored by NSS with the Space Pioneer Award at ISDC in May. Dr. Sherry Bell and friend called in from The Mars Society Gig regarding the announcement. We continued talking about SLS, Artemis, Starship, SSP, Settlement and more.

** Hotel Mars – Wednesday, Oct.19.2022Dr. Nancy Chabot spoke with  John Batchelor and Dr. David Livingston talked about “the success of the DART mission in shifting the orbit of the target asteroid Dimorphos around Didymos“.

** Tuesday, Oct.18.2022Dr. John Bossard discussed “his continued work on his rotary Turborocket Engine System“.

** See also:
* The Space Show Archives
* The Space Show Newsletter
* The Space Show Shop

The Space Show is a project of the One Giant Leap Foundation.

The Space Show - David Livingston
The Space Show – Dr. David Livingston

=== Amazon Ads ===

Escaping Gravity:
My Quest to Transform NASA and
Launch a New Space Age

===

The Space Value of Money:
Rethinking Finance Beyond Risk & Time

ESO: VLT captures the vast cloudy remains of the Vela supernova remnant

A report for the Halloween season from the European Southern Observatory (ESO):

ESO captures the ghost of a giant star

This image shows a spectacular view of the orange and pink clouds that make up what remains after the explosive death of a massive star — the Vela supernova remnant. This detailed image consists of 554 million pixels, and is a combined mosaic image of observations taken with the 268-million-pixel OmegaCAM camera at the VLT Survey Telescope, hosted at ESO’s Paranal Observatory.  OmegaCAM can take images through several filters that each let the telescope see the light emitted in a distinct colour. To capture this image, four filters have been used, represented here by a combination of magenta, blue, green and red. The result is an extremely detailed and stunning view of both the gaseous filaments in the remnant and the foreground bright blue stars that add sparkle to the image.

A spooky spider web, magical dragons or wispy trails of ghosts? What do you see in this image of the Vela supernova remnant? This beautiful tapestry of colours shows the ghostly remains of a gigantic star, and was captured here in incredible detail with the VLT Survey Telescope, hosted at the European Southern Observatory’s (ESO’s) Paranal site in Chile.

The wispy structure of pink and orange clouds is all that remains of a massive star that ended its life in a powerful explosion around 11 000 years ago. When the most massive stars reach the end of their life, they often go out with a bang, in an outburst called a supernova. These explosions cause shock waves that move through the surrounding gas, compressing it and creating intricate thread-like structures. The energy released heats the gaseous tendrils, making them shine brightly, as seen in this image.

In this 554-million-pixel image, we get an extremely detailed view of the Vela supernova remnant, named after the southern constellation Vela (The Sails). You could fit nine full Moons in this entire image, and the whole cloud is even larger. At only 800 light-years away from Earth, this dramatic supernova remnant is one of the closest known to us.

As it exploded, the outermost layers of the progenitor star were ejected into the surrounding gas, producing the spectacular filaments that we observe here. What remains of the star is an ultra-dense ball in which the protons and electrons are forced together into neutrons — a neutron star. The neutron star in the Vela remnant, placed slightly outside of this image to the upper left, happens to be a pulsar that spins on its own axis at an incredible speed of more than 10 times per second.

Dive into the details of the Vela supernova remnant with these 12 highlights, each showing a different intricate part of the beautiful pink and orange gaseous clouds and the bright stars in the foreground and background.

This image is a mosaic of observations taken with the wide-field camera OmegaCAM at the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), hosted at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile. The 268-million-pixel camera can take images through several filters that let through light of different colours. In this particular image of the Vela remnant, four different filters were used, represented here by a combination of magenta, blue, green and red.

The VST is owned by The National Institute for Astrophysics in Italy, INAF, and with its 2.6-metre mirror it is one of the largest telescopes dedicated to surveying the night sky in visible light. This image is an example from such a survey: the VST Photometric Hα Survey of the Southern Galactic Plane and Bulge (VPHAS+). For over seven years, this survey has mapped a considerable portion of our home galaxy, allowing astronomers to better understand how stars form, evolve and eventually die.

This image shows the process of going from the raw data captured by a telescope to a stunning astronomical image like the one featured here, showing the Vela supernova remnant as seen with the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). The detector registers the light collected by the telescope. OmegaCAM, the camera attached to the VST, has an array of 32 detectors covering a large field of view. The raw images contain artefacts and instrumental signatures such as dead pixels, shadows, or luminosity variations among detectors. These need to be corrected before the images can be used for scientific purposes. Astronomers correct these effects using calibration data. This process of going from raw to science-ready data is called ‘data reduction’. When an astronomical object is larger than the field of view one needs to stitch together  different images, typically called a mosaic. This also allows us to fill in the gaps in between the detectors.  The brightness of the background can vary among different parts of the mosaic, especially if they were observed on different nights, because of changes in the phase of the Moon and other effects. For instance, the upper-left corner of image 4 is darker than the rest of the image. By comparing overlapping areas between different images this can be corrected for. The mosaiced image is visually inspected, and any residual artefacts are corrected for. This includes, for example, imperfect seams between adjacent images. Astronomical detectors don’t capture colour images. Instead, several images are taken separately through filters that let through light of different wavelengths. These images are then assigned different colours and combined into a final colour image. The final colour image.

Links

=== Amazon Ads ===

An Infinity of Worlds:
Cosmic Inflation and the Beginning of the Universe

 

===

Asteroids: How Love, Fear, and Greed
Will Determine Our Future in Space

Videos: “Space to Ground” & other space habitat reports – Oct.28.2022

Here is the latest episode in NASA’s Space to Ground weekly report on activities related to the International Space Station:

** Expedition 68 Progress 82 Cargo Ship Docks to International Space Station – Oct. 27, 2022 – NASA Video

The uncrewed Roscosmos Progress 82 cargo craft docked to the International Space Station’s Poisk module October 27 following a launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan October 25 atop a Soyuz booster rocket. Progress is filled with almost three tons of supplies and cargo and will remain docked to the space station until early next year.

** Space Station Crew Answers U.S. Naval Test Pilot, Maryland Student Questions – Oct. 27, 2022 – NASA Video

Aboard the International Space Station, NASA Expedition 68 Flight Engineers Nicole Mann, Josh Cassada and Frank Rubio answered pre-recorded questions about life and work on the orbiting laboratory during an in-flight event October 27 with students attending the United States Naval Test Pilot School in Patuxent River, Maryland. Both Mann and Cassada are graduates of the school. Mann, Cassada, and Rubio are in the midst of a science mission living and working aboard the microgravity laboratory to advance scientific knowledge and demonstrate new technologies for future human and robotic exploration missions as part of NASA’s Moon and Mars exploration approach, including lunar missions through NASA’s Artemis program.

** NG-18 Research: UCSD Mudslides Investigation ISS National Lab – YouTube

As part of Northrop Grumman’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station, a research team from the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego) will send their research to the orbiting lab to better understand gravity’s effects on post-wildfire mudflow.

** Northrop Grumman’s S.S. Sally Ride spacecraft – What experiments are heading to space station? – VideoFromSpace

Learn what science experiments will launch to the International Space Station aboard the Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft. The CRS-18 mission is scheduled to launch on Nov. 6, 2022. The spaceraft is named S.S. Sally Ride to honor first American woman to fly in space: https://www.space.com/northrop-grumma…

** International Space Station Dodges Debris From Russian SatelliteTODAY

The International Space Station fired its thrusters for more than five minutes on Monday to avoid a potential collision with a piece of Russian satellite debris. The debris was created by Russia’s test-firing of a missile last year that destroyed one of its old satellites.

** Designers Explain New Mission of Long March-5B Carrier Rocket – CCTV Video News Agency

Designers from China’s space program have unveiled the details of the Long March-5B carrier rocket family just as one of its members is about to carry the Mengtian lab module into the sky.

** ISS Live video stream – IBM/ISS HD Earth Viewing Experiment

Currently, live views from the ISS are streaming from an external camera mounted on the ISS module called Node 2. Node 2 is located on the forward part of the ISS. The camera is looking forward at an angle so that the International Docking Adapter 2 (IDA2) is visible. If the Node 2 camera is not available due to operational considerations for a longer period of time, a continuous loop of recorded HDEV imagery will be displayed. The loop will have “Previously Recorded” on the image to distinguish it from the live stream from the Node 2 camera. After HDEV stopped sending any data on July 18, 2019, it was declared, on August 22, 2019, to have reached its end of life. Thank You to all who shared in experiencing and using the HDEV views of Earth from the ISS to make HDEV so much more than a Technology Demonstration Payload!

====

=== Amazon Ads ===

LEGO Ideas International Space Station Building Kit,
Adult Set for Display,
Makes a Great Birthday Present
(864 Pieces)

====

Outpost in Orbit:
A Pictorial & Verbal History of the Space Station

The Space Show this week – Oct.25.2022

The guests and topics of discussion on The Space Show this week:

1. Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022; 7 pm PST (9 pm CST, 10 pm EST):  We welcome Thomas Lagarde, a space architect and a specialist on extreme environments.

2. Hotel Mars – Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2022; 1:00 pm PST (3:00 pm CST, 4:00 pm EST): TBD. Check the Upcoming Show Menu at www.thespaceshow.com for  updates on scheduling.

3. Friday, Oct.28, 2022; 9:30-11 am PST (11:30 am-1 pm CST, 12:30-2 pm EST): We welcome back Thomas Marotta presenting a new perspective on the gravity prescription.

4. Sunday, Oct.30, 2022; 12-1:30 pm PST (2-3:30 pm CST, 3-4:30 pm EST): We welcome Jason Achilles to discuss microphones on the surface of the Moon, Mars and elsewhere plus his innovative Exocam. See www.exocam.io for details about this camera, which lets us see the spacecraft landing on its destination surface.

Some recent shows:

** Sunday, Oct.23.2022Dr. David Livingston led an open lines program with callers.

Thank you to those that offered me best wishes for the NSS Space Pioneer Award for 2023 which I will receive at ISDC 2023. We talked multiple topics with several callers and listeners sending in emails. The topics included fusion energy, interplanetary travel with fusion (or not), Starship, cislunar, and company news plus more.

** Friday, Oct.21.2022John Strickland  returned to the show and

announced that I was being honored by NSS with the Space Pioneer Award at ISDC in May. Dr. Sherry Bell and friend called in from The Mars Society Gig regarding the announcement. We continued talking about SLS, Artemis, Starship, SSP, Settlement and more.

** Hotel Mars – Wednesday, Oct.19.2022Dr. Nancy Chabot spoke with  John Batchelor and Dr. David Livingston talked about “the success of the DART mission in shifting the orbit of the target asteroid Dimorphos around Didymos“.

** Tuesday, Oct.18.2022Dr. John Bossard discussed “his continued work on his rotary Turborocket Engine System“.

** Sunday, Oct.16.2022Dr. Erik Seedhouse talked about his latest updated SpaceX/Elon Musk book [Amazon commission link], “Musk, Starship, SLS, and much more“.

** Friday, Oct.14.2022Dr. Charles Cockell discussed his new book, Taxi from Another Planet: Conversations with Drivers about Life in the Universe [Amazon commission link].

** See also:
* The Space Show Archives
* The Space Show Newsletter
* The Space Show Shop

The Space Show is a project of the One Giant Leap Foundation.

The Space Show - David Livingston
The Space Show – Dr. David Livingston

=== Amazon Ads ===

Escaping Gravity:
My Quest to Transform NASA and
Launch a New Space Age

===

The Space Value of Money:
Rethinking Finance Beyond Risk & Time